Pause in Blog

Whether permanent or not, this blog is now combined with my other one Alchemy of Clay. http://blackmtnbarb.blogspot.com/
go there, and then follow me over there. The personal and genealogical archives, and Black Mountain NC scenery and my potting life are combined. It's a good thing.

Wednesday, November 5, 2014

Fishing or enjoying water

OK, looking back, waaay back to 2009-10 for old photos, this is what I found.
A February visit to a lovely falls...Hooker Falls on the Little River in DuPont Forest, NC.

My friend is enjoying the sunshine on this cold day at the foot of the falls.
I have seen boats with fishermen in them over on the far side from the "swimming area."
The Little River tumbles over lots of falls, and provides many a trout pool, if only I knew how to catch them.  I prefer just going to a restaurant and having fresh catch (even if it comes from a farm!)
Hooker Falls has been known for years to local residents and was named for Edmund Hooker, who operated a mill below the falls in the late 1800s. At the time, it was named Mill Shoals Falls. The Falls was seen in the movie Last of the Mohicans as the falls the characters go over in canoes.
In the 1990s, DuPont Forest was sold to the State of North Carolina, and as DuPont has completed cleanup of various areas, those areas have been made open to the public.  (Source, Wikipedia)

In 2009 Siesta Key, FL, as we waited for a beautiful sunset.  Didn't see any fishermen either.

Siesta Key is a barrier island off the southwestern coast of Florida in the United States of America. It is situated between Roberts Bay and the Gulf of Mexico.  After the probable Amerindian name of Zarazote for the area and the bay, the key was originally named "Sarasota Key" by European cartographers during exploration beginning in 1513. That name can be seen on maps from the early 18th century as well as on all local maps drawn before the name change to "Siesta Key" in the 1920s. (Source: Wikipedia)

My North Carolina friends are vacationing right now on another Key near Sarasota, for a couple of weeks, while I help them by feeding their cats.  I hope they are enjoying this snshine!

In case you want to catch something closer to fish or fishing, look over at Sepia Saturday here.
I think my photos are a bit more pleasing than the one in the prompt, but that's just my personal taste.


18 comments:

Bel said...

We have a Hooker Falls in New Zealand as well. In the North Island. Nice photos.

Kerryn Taylor said...

They are beautiful photos Barb.

La Nightingail said...

These are all beautiful pictures, but my favorites are those of Hooker Falls. So pretty. I can just see myself sitting there in that sun listening to those falls while contentedly woolgathering. Or singing. I remember one time on a hike in the mountains coming to some pretty little musical falls on a small creek & sitting down to listen to them for a bit & suddenly bursting into song as if to join them, thinking no one could hear me because of the noise the falls were making. Wrong! Along came a father & son whom I didn't hear 'because of the noise the falls were making' just as I was finishing "Shall We Dance" from "The King & I", who gave me an odd smile as they crossed the creek & went on their way. Oh well . . .

Bob Scotney said...

I wonder whether Edmund Hooker was a fisherman. With a name like that he should have caught a lot of fish.

B. Rogers, Living in Black Mountain said...

Thanks Bel...I wonder if the Hookers tended to settle near streams with falls! That's a long distance apart from NC to NZ!
Thanks Kerryn for your praise, I appreciate it.
Gail, I am pretty sure I've been caught singing in the woods too...perhaps not quite as high a quality as you would have however!
Bob, that's a good question! Hopefully anyone living near water used it as a food resource.

Helen Bauch McHargue said...

Really nice photos. I wondered about Hooker's name also.

boundforoz said...

Such pretty countryside.

Wendy said...

Beautiful photos of the falls and all those rocks. I've been to Siesta Key too -- wouldn't mind going back.

Kristin said...

Beautiful water photos. I love the fishing photograph of your grandmother. Missing these photographs makes me miss the water.

L. D. said...

Your photos are all so great. I enjoyed the note to the cousin. I have cousins that are on the second and third remove that live in the area and I forget sometime that we really are rather closely related.

B. Rogers, Living in Black Mountain said...

Bob and Helen, you're probably right about people following their names, or is it the other way around, being named for their trades? I happen to know only one woman named Potter who makes pottery however.
Wendy, so glad you've also enjoyed Siesta Key!
Kristin, I think that was someone else's grandmother fishing, if I remember right. Thanks for visiting anyway!
LD, I dare say I wouldn't appreciate my cousins (if they'd been around all my life) half as much!

Jo Featherston said...

Looks like a beautiful location for fishing, hiking or relaxing, so long as there are no bears in the surrounding woods!

Cassmob (Pauleen) said...

The cats are probably hoping your friends being back some fish. Lovely scenery you have there.

Kathy Morales said...

Your photos made me want to be there enjoying the sound of the falls and the chill in the air.

Karen S. said...

yes, this was a delightful, and well needed post! Winter is moving in soon, and I want to treasure all that is not, winter!

Alex Daw said...

I can almost feel the sand beneath my feet in that first photo of Siesta Key. Thanks for sharing.

B. Rogers, Living in Black Mountain said...

Jo, I've never met a bear, though there are stories of them in the woods...but I've not been far away from cars and roads usually.
Oh Pauleen, what happy cats they would be if their folks bring them home fish!
Cathy and Karen, I think I avoided these falls during the summer, when there would have been crowds, just so I could enjoy nature totally.
Alex, you've made me wish to walk on a beach now!

Mike Brubaker said...

I just watched Last of the Mohicans only a few weeks ago on Netflix. I had not seen it since we've moved to North Carolina and I wondered where that scene was filmed. The Dupont forest waterfalls are indeed dramatic.