Rogers home, Huntsville, TX

The home of Col. George Washington Rogers and his wife, Lucinda Benson Gibbs - built abt. 1845 in Huntsville, TX. View shows north portico. He was my grandfather's grandfather.

Friday, May 24, 2013

Faces

For Sepia Saturday this week, I'd like to share an ancient photo of an ancestor...and it's naturally sepia too!  Come over to check out the rest of the Sepia portraits!



 OK, I may have to go searching through my family tree to figure out who he really was.  I love that my grandmother wrote right on the picture, she was Ada S Rogers. At least she said she was asking.  And the answer seems to be No, his great uncle...then there's a signature that might be Zulie...but it's really a stretch.  It is Ada S. Rogers' handwriting at the top however. saying Zulie G. Swasey uncle.

Let's see.  Ada. Swasey Rogers was daughter of Zulieka Granger Phillips Swasey, whose mother was Mary Hull Granger Phillips, who had a brother George W. Granger, and their father was George Tyler Granger.  I found the picture on Ancestry.com for George W. Granger, who would have been Zuleika G.P. Swasey's uncle.  However the notations take it back further, to being a brother of George Tyler's...in order to be her great uncle.   However, I haven't found out any more about George Tyler Granger's family tree yet.

So I'll leave this delightfully sober photograph attached to the person where I found it, though the notations sure sound like it should go back another generation.  But one thing I've sure learned in doing research is that researchers make mistakes, even my grandmother and perhaps her mother Zulieka might have made unclear notations.  It's only when I get to read the hand-written census reports, or pictures from family Bibles that I can verify things...and many times whoever transcribed them originally has made errors.

I am loving doing this kind of research though!




16 comments:

B. Rogers, Living in Black Mountain said...

Welllll...there are 3 generations with a Joseph Granger. Can we tell about when this gentleman posed by his clothes? The youngest Joseph Granger was born in 1835. His Uncle Joseph Granger was born 25 Sept 1797. And his father Joseph Granger was born 1765 and lived to 1847. The last one was a great grandfather of some level, so probably not in the running for Great Uncle Joseph status. Boy they did like the same name over and over again didn't they?

Bob Scotney said...

Barb - your link on the SS page did not work, I had to find this from the sidebar.
Interesting to see how much detective work is necessary with a photo such as this. Wish we had some to follow.

Alan Burnett said...

It is not just fun doing the research, it is also fun (and enlightening) reading about the research in posts like this. You get such an insight into different times in different places - living history.

Patrica Ball Morrison said...

I spend many hours researching on Ancestry.com. I have found many errors in the hand written census documents, so I am leary, most often the names are misspelled and sometimes completely changing the name of the Polish ancestors. I had to reread your opening introduction about the man in the photo, it surely helps to have some family reference....

B. Rogers, Living in Black Mountain said...

I agree about the Ancestry.com resources...but whenever I get to the hand written sheets, it's much better than the transcriptions. Of course spelling of names is a hoot! Wonder why volunteers who couldn't write well were accepted to do census reports. Yes, Bob, I re-posted to SS, don't know why I must have been asleep when I did the link before.

Brett Payne said...

My guess is that this was taken in the late 1860s or early 1870s, if that's of any use to you.

B. Rogers, Living in Black Mountain said...

Thanks Brett, that would make it not Great Uncle Joseph, but just Uncle Joseph, because this gentleman seems to not be over 50. I'm so happy to know that, and will leave photo attached to George W. Granger! By the way, what made you deduce such info?

Brett Payne said...

Hi Barb - This is a carte de visite format and the style of sitting i.e. a three-quarter length seated portrait, together with studio setting, clothing and hair styles, all point to that period. The simple text printed on the back of the card mount in a single font would be more typical of the 1860s than the 1870s. I'd say this man looks to be at least in his 40s, and perhaps 50s.

B. Rogers, Living in Black Mountain said...

Great thoughts! But the younger Uncle would have been 30 in 1865, where the elder would have been 50 by 1857. So baldness may make him look older, but... And, I know the younger Uncle Joseph moved to Texas before the Civil War, so the picture might have been taken before 1861 because of that! In which case, mmm, he does look older than 30. Isn't this fun! I'll see if I can locate a census for 1850 or 1860 to determine if he was still in Newburyport, MA.

B. Rogers, Living in Black Mountain said...

OK, my conclusions from looking at census of Tolland MA, for 1880, that Uncle George W. Granger is indeed the man in the picture. (at least today's conclusion.) He gave his age as 59 in that census, where he actually wrote the whole page as the enumerator, and his penmanship is fabulous. So for some reason he was older than the birth date of 1830 which would have made him only 50 for the 1880 census. Who knows why he changed his own age, but it sure makes things hard to chase down!

Wendy said...

It's a great photo, and a fun puzzle to figure out.

Nigel Aspdin (Derby, UK) said...

I don't recall ever coming across the name Zulieka...so I took a look at what modern day Zuliekas look like: http://goo.gl/xKvhf

B. Rogers, Living in Black Mountain said...

Ha! Nigel, they look just like Susan's and Barbara's to me!

Kathy Morales said...

The puzzle continues for generations! I hope you find the proof you seek about the handsome gentleman in the photo.

Helen Bauch McHargue said...

What fun to unravel these puzzles. I too have found numerous errors in the various records.

Karen S. said...

Researching is so much fun, and all the unexpected and interesting things we often find along the way! One of my dear grandmothers was named Ada! Ada Harriet, and her middle name of course was from her mother's name.